John Holm's An introduction to pidgins and creoles PDF

By John Holm

ISBN-10: 0521584604

ISBN-13: 9780521584609

This textbook is a transparent and concise creation to the learn of the way new languages come into being. beginning with an summary of the field's simple suggestions, it surveys the recent languages that constructed as a result of eu growth to the Americas, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. lengthy misunderstood as "bad" models of ecu languages, this present day such kinds as Jamaican Creole English, Haitian Creole French and New Guinea Pidgin are famous as particular languages of their personal correct.

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L. Schumann wrote a 55-page manuscript dictionary of Saramaccan in 1778 (reproduced in Schuchardt 1914a) and a 135-page manuscript dictionary of Sranan in 1783 (reproduced in Kramp 1983). Like Oldendorp, Schumann distinguished between the creole as spoken by whites and by blacks. In 1778 Pieter van Dyk published a 112-page book on the ‘Bastert Engels’ of Suriname, with parallel columns in Sranan and Dutch – the first book published on a creolized variety of English. As on St Thomas, the Moravians developed a literary variety of the creole for translating the scriptures.

3 Other terms In addition to those terms in italics introduced in the preceding two sections, there are some other terms to be explained here that will recur in the following chapters. They are largely confined to (or have a particular meaning in) pidgin and creole linguistics (sometimes shortened to creolistics; cf. French créolistique or German Kreolistik). g. relexification, bioprogram) are explained in chapter 2 and can be found in the index. g. in Jamaica, where English is the official  Introduction language), there has been a historical tendency for the creole to drop its most noticeable non-European features, often (but not always) replacing them with European ones – or what are taken to be such.

G. a child)’, whence the past participle criado ‘(a person) raised; a servant born into one’s household’. Crioulo, with a diminutive suffix, came to mean an African slave born in the New World in Brazilian usage. The word’s meaning was then extended to include Europeans born in the New World. The word finally came to refer to the customs and speech of Africans and Europeans born in the New World. It was later borrowed as Spanish criollo, French créole, Dutch creools and English creole. 3 Other terms In addition to those terms in italics introduced in the preceding two sections, there are some other terms to be explained here that will recur in the following chapters.

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An introduction to pidgins and creoles by John Holm


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